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Remember a time without supercomputers

Imagine a time before supercomputers, fiber-optic internet, and high-temperature superconducting magnets. This week, we invite you to journey back to that era. To illustrate this, let’s take a look at one of our vintage photographs of the former Textor Tokamak in Jülich. Hand-drawn and crafted using traditional machining techniques, this remarkable machine provided valuable data for over 30 years. Its contributions continue to form the foundation for the development of more advanced and larger machines like JET, Wendelstein 7-X, ITER and one day DEMO.

Think of the progress that has been made in recent decades: Advanced technologies such as nuclear fusion requires time and progress in various fields of research, not just plasma physics. The next generation of physicists and engineers will be responsible for combining all the accumulated knowledge – a daunting task that could change the world.

So, by looking at the past – what do you think is needed to build up a nuclear fusion industry in the future? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.

Image of the former Textor Tokamak, picture courtesy of Foschungszentrum Jülich GmbH
Alexander Lau, Doctoral researcher IEK, Materials and Components, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, picture courtesy of Alexander Lau.
Alexander Lau, Doctoral researcher IEK, Materials and Components, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH. Picture courtesy of Alexander Lau.

“We should always remember the invaluable contributions of those who dedicated their entire professional lives to a technology they knew they would never see in action. These pioneers were driven by the conviction that their work could one day be the key to satisfying our endless hunger for sustainable, long-term energy. Their dedication and foresight represent a truly honorable attitude that deserves our celebration and gratitude.”

– Alexander Lau

Find Alexander Lau on LinkedIn and Twitter: @LauAlexander164.

Join us in this exciting journey as we uncover the intricacies and innovations of nuclear fusion. Share your thoughts in the comment section below, engage in the discussion, and be a part of shaping our energy future!

One Response

  1. I worked for years building components for high energy physics at Fermilab. Retired now, but still following progress on DUNE.

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